Thursday, April 5, 2012

"... everything has to do with loving ..."








I am (s)he that aches with love;
Does the earth gravitate?
Does not all matter, aching, attract all matter?
So the body of me to all I meet or know.

~Walt Whitman









A night full of talking that hurts,
My worst held-back secrets;
Everything has to do with loving and not loving.
This night will pass.
Then we have work to do, painstaking work.
Then the swan opens its wings.

~Rumi



16 comments:

  1. I really like these two images, Bonnie, especially the second, which is both stunningly beautiful and intriguing. Yes, I suppose Rumi is right in his observation that "everything has to do with loving or not loving," but a thousand questions remain. What does it truly mean to love, and what is the difference between true love and true affection? And the question that is always crawling up and down my spine: Can you love someone without having any genuine affection for him or her? I was discussing this with my wife earlier this evening.

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  2. nice...i like the first best i think...a little more subtle...i really like the different expressions you were able to capture...

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  3. Thank you George. What truly worthy questions you have submitted!

    As for your last question - it is a difficult one when we are limited by the English language. In Greek, however, there are several words for love - each one denoting a different form of love.

    Some I can recall off the top of my head are: philia, (friendship); storge, (familial love); eros, erotic love; and one that most applies to your question - agape, which refers to principled love. Agape love would be the love where out of love for humankind, we would seek justice for someone whether we hold affection for them or not. Another example of agape love would be when we love and respect a member of our family who holds values we do not share. We can act in a principled way around them even if we do not want to maintain a close relationship with them. We would also be demonstrating agape love when we attend to an injured party who may have just committed a crime - we feel no affection or respect for them but our behavior is an act of principled love for the humanity and right to life of the person.

    Therefore using the more precise Greek word "agape", I would answer yes that we can demonstrate love for someone while not having affection for them.

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  4. Thanks Brian. Something for everyone! :)

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  5. I love them both. Im amazed. So Gorgeous.

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  6. Enchanting images and love the poetic accompaniment :).
    Stay inspired!

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  7. Love the two images...especially the second one. Fabulous!!
    And the quotes are amazing!
    Enjoy your weekend!
    Hugs
    SueAnn

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  8. Thanks for your thoughtful response to my comment, Bonnie. I can accept the importance of agape, the need to love in a "principled way," but the heart often feels empty when there is no longer any natural affection for a person. Agape love is more like trying to "do the right thing," but we also long to feel the right thing. Such are the hurdles for romantics like me.

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  9. Hi Bonnie - beautiful images and quotes. A gift on this "good Friday", thank you...
    Love Gail
    peace.....

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  10. Sounds like you are referring to a lack of affection in a primary relationship and, of course, agape love does not satisfy the heart's needs in this case. Sometimes, if we can be patient, affection and passion can rekindle. If not, there are choices to be made. Stay and make the best of it or recognize the limits of the situation and that it is unfair to the other as well as to the self. If one chooses to let go of a now 'empty' relationship, one can use principled love to effect the difficult change.

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  11. Oooops - I neglected to address the last comment to GEORGE.

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  12. Whitman and Rumi knew how to say it.

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  13. I am simply enchanted. Drawn right in by both the words and your talented art work! One of my favorite pieces that my husband had made for me is a photo of me with several different looks on my face made into a collage of faces. Its the same concept of your own work :)

    My Oncologist loves language - he asserted once that if we all could just study Greek we'd learn so much more about languages and the roots of words... I'm inclined to agree :)

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  14. wow! those are beautiful! I really love your work, Bonnie!

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