Tuesday, June 29, 2010

two more paintings





 






20 comments:

  1. these are really cool bonnie...the first one seems a figure, possibly caught in headlights...nice textures

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  2. Wow. I particularly like that second one.

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  3. I really do like these Bonnie. A lot.

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  4. Very cool. I've been enjoying catching up on you blog.. so many lovely photos which you place in mosaic/collage form. I'm so far behind but am glad that I've gotten this far.

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  5. 1. Talk dark mother figure (hair in bun). She's loking at child (yellow figure bathed in white light) running toward her. Child is innocent and wants approval. Mom is aloof, imposing.
    2. Two people embracing (a la klimt) while third party looks on. 3rd party is excluded - embracers have eyes only for each other.
    Bonnie, those shadowy, peripheral figures of yours often have the same set of firm, angled shoulders. What does this mean?

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  6. Oh Bonnie,

    I don't usually have such a strong reaction to artwork, but these made me teary eyed almost instantly. I'm trying to identify the feeling. I think it is beauty, like glimpsing an angel but there seems to be something sad there.

    What do they mean to you?

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  7. that second one is just amazing....
    that green figure on the right, looking at the ominous grey figure on the left....wow wow wow !

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  8. Thank you ALL for your feedback, reactions and interpretations. Very interesting for me to read.

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  9. Kathryn: Interesting feedback. I had not seen the child figure you describe in #1, but now that you mention it ...

    It took me a while to see the Klimt-like embracing figures - but I think I see them now. I was more aware of the space between them looking like a ghost-like figure shrouded in black. I love hearing what you see!

    Great question! Your right that is a shoulder angle I often use. The regular me would say it is just habit and my palette knife does that by rote.

    The artist me would say I find that angle aesthetically pleasing.

    The therapist me would say that an angled shoulder could indicate pain, defense or deference. Deference is often indicated by the tilt of the head (more common in women than men) and can make the shoulder rise slightly. My mother always spoke with head tilted. It was a habit, but also a way I think she used to camouflage her intelligence when speaking with men.

    Thank you for pointing it out to me - I will think about how it might apply to me.

    As a therapist I would also say that a painting is like a Rorschasch blot and that what you see might say more about you than the artist. However, seeing a pattern in the artist's work would indicate it is more about the artist.

    You are very observant and I love thinking about your observations!

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  10. Butternut Squash: Thank you for the feedback. Your observations make sense to me. I paint quickly and with a palette knife in these pieces. I do not think ... I just do. That being said ... with no interference from my left brain, my right brain may be laying out all kinds of emotion on the canvas. Sadness has been an emotion that has accompanied me most of my life - some of it genetic - some of it experience-based. I have also heard of so much sadness in my work and must have absorbed some by osmosis in the process. So that being said - it does not surprise me that it comes through in my artwork.

    My goodness - you are all helping me learn more about what I am committing to canvas!!!

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  11. Beth: Oh - you see the gray figure too. I did not paint it deliberately. I just stepped back and there it was. The other green figure was more deliberate. Thank you so much for the comment.

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  12. I love them both, but the second one "grabs" me!

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  13. D'oh! I missed the small green figure in #2!
    I love how you answered my question from different parts of you - artist, therapist, etc. They each make sense, and validate my "sliced" way of looking at things too. My brain answers questions in layers as well. Frustrates my family, though...

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  14. Kathryn: I didn't see any small green figure until you mentionned it in your last comment. Spooky .... little figures popping out everywhere! Well - as you also pointed out - I am (we are) made up of many parts ...

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  15. I loved that second one. Especially because I'm drawn to rainy, foggy, misty landscapes (must be the autumn sign in me :-D). Many thanks.

    Greetings from London.

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  16. Wow - great paintings. Thanks for commenting on the church in Ghana article over at Holli's Ramblings - it directed me here! I'm your newest follower!

    Cheers - Holli in Ghana

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  17. So clearly from your soul - landscapes of the interior.

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  18. Striking paintings, Bonnie, especially the first one, in which I see a lovely young woman, her hair pinned back, looking down at a book of poetry in her hands, her figure surrounded by the white spring blossoms of a tree.

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